High-load environments

Tuning EVA ICS

To use EVA ICS in high-load environments, remember the following:

  • Always turn off debug mode. Debug mode significantly slows down all EVA ICS components.
  • Make sure no notifiers are subscribed to the frequently (more than ~10 times per second) updated item states. If you need to synchronize states of such items, reduce remote controller reload intervals instead but set them higher than 1 second.
  • Unsubscribe notifiers from INFO log messages and actions
  • Replace db_updates = instant in Universal Controller configurations with on_exit or manual.
  • If you don’t need action history, set keep_action_history in controllers’ configuration to zero to disable it.
  • Turn off logging (comment log_file property in configuration) and reduce keep_logmem value.
  • If you use passive updates, set polldelay to the minimal value (0.001 - 0.005 for 1-5ms)

Hardware

EVA ICS is written in Python 3. It is not the fastest programming language in the world, but thanks to EVA ICS architecture and optimization for modern multi-core CPUs, the platform can provide good results even on a microcomputers. System components and CLI tools may require more time to launch on architectures different than Intel x86_64, but the regular performance should not be affected even on an embedded ARM-based systems.

Benchmarks

Benchmark tests for Universal Controller can be performed with tests/benchmark-uc-crt tool. Benchmark results may be different on a systems with different background load, so please stop all unnecesseary processes before starting a test.

The primary parameter for UC which’s bening benchmarked is a time, required for the controller to:

  • obtain item state from driver
  • perform a simple in-core event handling (convert item value to float and then compare with a float number) with self thread-locking
  • get action requiest from event handler and execute it using another driver

The time between a moment when the first driver gets new item value and a moment when the second driver is ready to call equipment action is named Core Reaction Time (CRT).

The benchmark tool for Universal Controller turns on internal controller benchmark, performs 1000 CRT tests with 30ms delays on a single sensor/unit pair and displays the average CRT value in milliseconds.

The benchmark is performed on virtual drivers, so the actual system reaction time may be higher than CRT, depending on the equipment connected.

Warning

It’s not recommended to perform a real benchmarking tests on SOHO and light industry relays due to their limited lifetime (~100-200k switches)

Below are benchmark results on a test systems (lower CRT is better):

System CPU Cores EVA ICS CRT, ms
VMWare ESXi 5.5 Intel Xeon E5630 2.53GHz 1 3.1.1 2018101701 4.5
VMWare ESXi 5.5 Intel Xeon E5630 2.53GHz 4 3.1.1 2018101701 3
VMWare ESXi 5.5 Intel Xeon D-1528 1.90GHz 1 3.1.1 2018101701 5
VMWare ESXi 5.5 Intel Xeon D-1528 1.90GHz 4 3.1.1 2018101701 3.5
Supermicro X9SXX Intel Xeon E3-1230 V2 3.30GHz 8 3.1.1 2018101701 4
Supermicro E100 Intel Atom E3940 1.60GHz 4 3.1.1 2018101701 8.5
Raspberry Pi 1A ARMv6 rev 7 v6l 1 3.1.1 2018101701 110
Raspberry Pi 2B ARMv7 rev 5 v7l 4 3.1.1 2018101701 22.5
Raspberry Pi 3B+ ARMv7 rev 4 v7l 4 3.1.1 2018101701 21
UniPi Axon S115 ARMv8 Cortex-A53 4 3.1.1 2018101701 27